About the Project

Meet the Team

Isabel Zhou

Isabel Zhou

Project Manager
Editor

Keven Michel

Keven Michel

Project Manager
Data Visualizations

Aaron Tann

Aaron Tann

Editor
Content Developer

Nick Hom

Nick Hom

Web Designer
Data Visualizations

Dvin Malekian

Dvin Malekian

Content Developer
Web Designer

Avyay Kuchibatla

Avyay Buchibatla

Data Specialist

Responsibilities

This project was constructed by the following members of the UCLA undergraduate community engaging in the Digital Humanities 101 course. All team members assisted with research, writing, and production, however, each member primarily worked on ensuring quality and accuracy in their dedicated segments.
Isabel helped oversee the overall progress of the project and created meeting times to work as a team as the project manager. Doubling as an editor, she helped assist in the writing of the narrative and the about page. Isabel is a fourth year Economics major.
Keven oversaw the execution and planning of the project by developing a schedule for the team to follow and goals to reach. As data visualization specialist, Keven helped develop some graphics created on Tableau. He is a fourth-year student studying Classical Civilization and Digital Humanities.
Aaron led the revisions in all aspects of the project as the primary editor, from the narrative to the website and data analyses. As the secondary content developer, Aaron contributed significantly to the construction of the humanities narrative by bridging the connection between the literary scholarship and datasets. He is a third year transfer student majoring in Communication.
Nick led the web design and development process, from the initial creation of the domain to the blueprints and wireframing of the information architecture to the development of the project within WordPress. He also assisted in the creation and refinement of all data visualizations and acted to ensure they fit in cohesion with the project “brand.” Nick is a third-year student studying Cognitive Science with a Specialization in Computing.
Dvin helped construct the argument of the project by using information from scholars in the field of information technology. By focusing on the significance of the project, and with the help of his colleagues, he was able to formulate the central idea that the more someone has social connectedness, the better their job prospects will be. He also worked with Nick in developing an early blueprint for the website and then creating each section where they later filled with the research information. He is a third-year student studying Sociology.
Avyay was the data and data visualization specialist. He is a fourth-year Statistics major.

Acknowledgements

This project could not have been successful without the guidance from Dr. Ashley Sanders-Garcia and Ruth Livier. From their deep knowledge and formal experience in the field of digital humanities, we were able to hone in our research on an otherwise abstract collection of data and synthesize a cohesive narrative.

Sources

Our team used various sources to help us understand the relationship between individuals and their value for employment. We are using data from the Social Connectedness Index (SCI) provided by Facebook. According to the Facebook Data for Good webpage, this data is used to measure the strength of connectedness between two geographic areas with Facebook friendship ties. From this data we were able to analyze information in regards to counties within each state and their SCI numbers. In addition to the SCI data, we also analyzed employment data from the United States Department of Labor. This data helped us understand the counties with low or high unemployment and also compare the number of SCI to the employment rates within those counties. We also used various articles that focus on an individual’s identity and territory, social media identity, and social media behavior to help provide us with perspective.

Processing

From the Facebook dataset, we were provided the social connectedness for countries to countries, US counties to US counties, US counties to countries, and global areas. For our research, the data provided for US counties to US counties obtained the most value. From the counties to counties dataset, we were able to obtain the two user locations and their social connectedness index. With our unemployment dataset, we found the most value in the data for 2019 unemployment and the FIPS codes. Through Tableau, we were able to upload the datasets and edit the relationship amongst them. We connected the first user location to the FIPS code and created a second field to connect the second user location to the FIPS code.

Presentation

We built our website using WordPress and hosted our domain through HumSpace, a web hosting service provided by the University of California, Los Angeles to the university’s humanities department. With WordPress offering the basic CMS on which to build our project, we utilized Elementor, a free website-building plugin, to simultaneously lay out and style every element. But, while Elementor offered the basic tools for layouts and styling, we wrote and embedded additional CSS and JavaScript code to tailor specific elements to our desired aesthetic.

We made additional accessibility considerations throughout the design and execution of the webpage: font sizes and colors are large and bold enough to be read on a a computer screen, the pages’ navigation systems are organized for simple tab-navigation both within and between each page, and all images contain alt-tags to ensure accessibility by the visually-impaired.

Our Cited Works

Follow the link below to find a detailed list of all of our cited resources, links for further exploration, and detailed notes by the project team: